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Tag: Randy Mains




Oct
05
2015

But We’ve Always Done it This Way - My Two Cents

Posted by jhadmin

Has anyone ever said to you, “But we’ve always done it this way”? It’s a complacency trap that once held the potential for dire consequences for five of us employed as HEMS pilots for the king of Saudi Arabia. I was new to the organization, standing on the bridge of the king’s yacht with the chief pilot. We were both looking half a mile away through binoculars as he explained the approach to the hospital helipad. “You’ll fly to the waypoint listed “WALL” in the GPS, which is the wall at the edge of the palace grounds. Once you reach it, you’ll make a left 90-degree dogleg turn, keeping those five construction cranes on your right while staying well clear of that big unlit stadium on your left. See it?” [Read More...]



Tags: My Two Cents Randy Mains
Categories: categoryTraining categorySafety categoryOpinion-Editorial categoryHuman Interest



Aug
24
2015

Spies in the Oil Field - My Two Cents July 2015

Posted by jhadmin

If I were to answer the question as to why I love the helicopter industry so much, I would have to say it’s because of the quirky characters I’ve met and worked with over the years. Characters that immediately come to mind are guys like “Lofty” because of his extraordinary height, “Bambi” because of his doe-brown eyes, a Brit we called “Captain Kleenex” because he had a sinus condition that caused him to leave tissues strewn about all over the cockpit, “Too Tall McCall” because he was short, and an Australian we all called “Trackless” because he was even shorter than Two Tall. (In fact, he was much shorter because his legs were so short his butt would drag behind him and wipe out his tracks, hence the name.) There was also Robert “Don’t call me Bob” because that’s how he introduced himself, “Squeaky Cheeks” because he had an odd walk, a New Zealander we called “Sumo” because he resembled a Sumo Wrestler, a Brit we called “Crusher” because he landed on a load handler hooking up an underslung load on a wellhead in the oil field and “slightly” crushed him. [Read More...]



Tags: Helicopter Oil and Gas My Two Cents Randy Mains
Categories: categoryOpinion-Editorial categoryHuman Interest categoryTraining categoryHelicopter Sectors



Jul
20
2015

Communication Breakdown - My Two Cents June 2015 Issue

Posted by jhadmin

The problem with communication is the perception that it’s been achieved. —George Bernard Shaw, Irish playwright Boy, was ol’ George right. Communication is central to effective crew resource management. An ambiguous message, whether written or spoken, can lead to fatal consequences. With that thought in mind, one would think airline executives, when drafting memos to flight crews, would take great pains to avoid ambiguity at all cost. Apparently, they don’t. Consider the following 1996 memo distributed to pilots at British Airways in an effort to clarify new pilot role titles: [Read More...]



Tags: My Two Cents Randy Mains
Categories: categoryTraining categorySafety categoryCareer Development categoryOpinion-Editorial



Jun
15
2015

My Two Cents Worth - May 2015

Posted by jhadmin

Maintenance engineers and mechanics have known about ‘The Dirty Dozen’ for years. They are the 12 most common human error preconditions or conditions that act as precursors to accidents or incidents for mechanics. I first learned about The Dirty Dozen when I put together a crew resource management course for helicopter engineers and mechanics. I instantly realized that pilots would be safer if they knew about these dozen error traps too. The Dirty Dozen is a concept developed in 1993 by Gordon DuPont, when he worked for Transport Canada. They have since become a cornerstone in maintenance training courses worldwide. [Read More...]



Tags: Helicopter Safety helicopter training My Two Cents Worth Randy Mains The Dirty Dozen
Categories: categoryTraining categorySafety categoryOpinion-Editorial



Apr
22
2015

My Two Cents Worth - April 2015

Posted by jhadmin

In the 1989 movie Field of Dreams, Kevin Costner hears ghostly voices coming from his Iowa cornfield telling him, “If you build it they will come,” meaning he should build a baseball diamond and former members from the Chicago Black Sox would come. Each day for the two months that I worked building a crew resource management instructor’s course, a similar line kept replaying in my head: What if I build it and no one comes? [Read More...]



Tags: Crew Resource Management crm Helicopter Safety My Two Cents Worth Randy Mains
Categories: categoryTraining categorySafety categoryHelicopter Sectors categoryOpinion-Editorial



Apr
15
2015

My Two Cents Worth - March 2015

Posted by RandyMains

“The doctor told me I’d never walk again,” former Utah flight nurse Stein Rosqvist told the group with obvious emotion. “I saw that wheelchair being pushed towards me down the corridor and said, ‘That’s definitely not for me.’” Through months of physical therapy by a nurse that would not permit him to say, “I can’t,” Stein walks today. His is just one of the stories I heard during the three-day digital story workshop I attended recently in Denver, Colorado. [Read More...]



Tags: Helicopter EMS My Two Cents Worth Randy Mains
Categories: categoryTraining categorySafety categoryHelicopter Sectors categoryOpinion-Editorial



Jun
25
2014

My Two Cents Worth (April 2014) by Randy Mains

Posted by jhadmin

My Two Cents Worth (April 2014 Issue) by Randy Mains I love aviation humor. I love it because I’ve found it always carries an element of truth. Consider the following homework assignment purported to have been written by a fifth grade student at Jefferson School, Beaufort, SC. entitled: Why I want to be a Pilot When I grow up I want to be a pilot because it's a fun job and easy to do. That's why there are so many pilots flying around these days. Pilots don't need much school. [Read More...]

Tags: My Two Cents Randy Mains
Categories: categoryHumor & Poetry categoryOpinion-Editorial categoryHuman Interest



Mar
20
2014

My Two Cents Worth (February 2014 Issue) - Randy Mains

Posted by jhadmin

My Two Cents Worth (Rotorcraft Pro February 2014 Issue) by Randy Mains What does it mean to you to be a professional? With that thought in mind, do you possess the attributes of a professional? What do you think are essential qualities of a true professional? Conversely, what qualities would you consider to be found in someone who is not a professional? Considering what it takes to be professional – and unprofessional – will make you aware of what we all strive to be: a true professional in our chosen occupation. [Read More...]

Tags: Randy Mains
Categories: categoryTraining categorySafety categoryOpinion-Editorial



Feb
13
2014

My Two Cents Worth (January 2014 Issue) - Randy Mains

Posted by jhadmin

My Two Cents Worth - Randy Mains Wouldn’t it be great if there were a big fat red warning light on the instrument panel that would illuminate whenever we were putting our passengers and ourselves in harm’s way? Well there is, but it’s not on the instrument panel – it’s in your head. Research has shown that nearly 80% of all aircraft accidents in history have had an element of human error, which means it isn’t stick-and-rudder skills that are killing people – bad pilot decision-making is killing people. [Read More...]

Tags: Randy Mains
Categories: categoryTraining categorySafety categoryOpinion-Editorial



Dec
05
2013

My Two Cents Worth (November 2013 Issue) - Randy Mains

Posted by jhadmin

It appears the Australians put a higher value on patient safety than our FAA, NTSB and even Congress. That’s a pretty strong statement, isn’t it? Let me tell you how I arrived at that conclusion. When my article “The Power of CRM” appeared in the August 2013 issue of Rotorcraft Pro my wife, Kaye, and I were in Australia, flown there by the Aeromedical Society of Australasia so that I could deliver two keynote speeches at their 25th scientific meeting of HEMS operators. My first keynote address was entitled “US Aeromedical Accidents – What can Australasian HEMS learn from our Mistakes?” On the second day I delivered a keynote address entitled “CRM in Aeromedical Operations - Why CRM/AMRM (Air Medical Resource Management) is Absolutely Vital to HEMS Safety.” [Read More...]

Tags: Randy Mains
Categories: categoryTraining categorySafety categoryRegulatory categoryOpinion-Editorial categoryHuman Interest


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