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Tag: Helicopter Safety




Apr
25
2016

Voice for the Voiceless

Posted by RandyMains        0 Comments
RandyMains

It certainly wasn’t my intention to be on drugs when I addressed FAA regulators at the “Meet the FAA Regulators” session at HAI Heli-Expo 2014. Two hours prior to that talk, I literally couldn’t walk. My back suddenly went out causing excruciating lower back pain, something that occurs every three years or so due to years of competitive tennis and decades in the cockpit. Still, I needed to tell the regulators that they missed a real opportunity to draft meaningful new rules to stop the unacceptable HEMS accident rate. Throwing a mix of over-the-counter painkillers down my throat, I gingerly made my way to the convention center. [Read More...]



Tags: Helicopter Safety Randy Mains
Categories: categoryMy Two Cents Worth



Jul
23
2015

Spies in the Oil Field

Posted by RandyMains        3 Comments
RandyMains

If I were to answer the question as to why I love the helicopter industry so much, I would have to say it’s because of the quirky characters I’ve met and worked with over the years. Characters that immediately come to mind are guys like “Lofty” because of his extraordinary height, “Bambi” because of his doe-brown eyes, a Brit we called “Captain Kleenex” because he had a sinus condition that caused him to leave tissues strewn about all over the cockpit, “Too Tall McCall” because he was short, and an Australian we all called “Trackless” because he was even shorter than Two Tall. (In fact, he was much shorter because his legs were so short his butt would drag behind him and wipe out his tracks, hence the name.) There was also Robert “Don’t call me Bob” because that’s how he introduced himself, “Squeaky Cheeks” because he had an odd walk, a New Zealander we called “Sumo” because he resembled a Sumo Wrestler, a Brit we called “Crusher” because he landed on a load handler hooking up an underslung load on a wellhead in the oil field and “slightly” crushed him. [Read More...]



Tags: Helicopter Safety My Two Cents Randy Mains
Categories: categoryMy Two Cents Worth



Apr
23
2015

Field of Dreams

Posted by RandyMains        1 Comments
RandyMains

In the 1989 movie Field of Dreams, Kevin Costner hears ghostly voices coming from his Iowa cornfield telling him, “If you build it they will come,” meaning he should build a baseball diamond and former members from the Chicago Black Sox would come. Each day for the two months that I worked building a crew resource management instructor’s course, a similar line kept replaying in my head: What if I build it and no one comes? [Read More...]



Tags: Crew Resource Management CRM Helicopter Safety My Two Cents Worth Randy Mains
Categories: categoryMy Two Cents Worth



Feb
23
2015

CRM Tips for the Single Pilot

Posted by RandyMains        3 Comments
RandyMains

Last year, HAI President Matt Zuccaro pushed his safety message, “Land the Damn Helicopter,” reminding us that as a last resort when we’ve run out of options, we have the power to break a potential link in an error chain by simply landing. Research into why helicopters crash isn’t statistically different than other segments of aviation. It is pretty much agreed worldwide that 80 percent of all aviation accidents have an element of human error. Crew resource management (CRM) training can save the day before we need to resort to landing the damn helicopter. CRM, if practiced religiously, will keep your good hands from taking you somewhere your mind hasn’t been. [Read More...]



Tags: Crew Resource Management CRM Helicopter Safety Helicopter Training Randy Mains
Categories: categoryMy Two Cents Worth



Feb
23
2015

Sliding To A Standard - The Running/Roll-On Landing

Posted by RandyRowles        0 Comments
RandyRowles

Within the FAA’s practical test standard (PTS) for helicopters, the proficiency requirements to successfully demonstrate a running/roll-on landing are identified. They are seemingly simple: establish and maintain: a shallow approach angle, a proper rate of closure, and proper flight control technique after surface contact. The PTS wants us to talk about surface texture, height/velocity diagram, and factors affecting performance data, all really good topics. However, I’ve found a question that few applicants can answer: Why are we here? [Read More...]



Tags: Helicopter Landings Helicopter Procedures Helicopter Safety Helicopter Training Randy Rowles
Categories: categoryRotorcraft Checkride